I did post the answer to this question this morning, but it is now missing!  So here it is again – – Sarah Piazza answered the question correctly.  Nick Giacobe did as well, but not before Sarah.  I mention that, because it is an impressive question to answer:-)

The problem is actually a classic statistical calculation.  More information can be found on this problem (as well as other permutations of the problem) here.  But the basic solution is based on the following premise: The probability of two people not having the same birthday is relatively high, at (365*364)/(365*365).  The probability of two of three people not having the same birthday is (365*364*363)/(365^3).  Extending this calculation to a group of 25 people will give you the following equation:

365*364*363…343*342*341
             365^25

And the final probability of no two people having the same birthday in a group of 25 is 0.4313 or 43.13%.  That means that the probability of two people having the same birthday in a group of 25 is 56.87%.  Isn’t that SHOCKING!?!??!!

Trivia #10 Answer

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